I Cannot Hold You (Part 3)

Friday, July 5

7-5By Charles Curry of Apple Valley, Minnesota, USA

…and he took the seven loaves, and after giving thanks he broke them and gave them to his disciples to distribute; and they distributed them to the crowd…They ate and were filled; and they took up the broken pieces left over, seven baskets full…Jesus went on with his disciples to the villages of Caesarea Philippi; and on the way he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that I am?” And they answered him, “John the Baptist; and others, Elijah; and still others, one of the prophets.” He asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, “You are the Messiah.”

—Mark 8:6, 8, 27–29

“Who do you say that I am?” I have found more answers—but these cannot hold me.

I say you are a poem—of which school is impossible to say. If I look to old psalms, you are there. But psalms cannot hold you.

If I look to the stories about you, you are there. But stories cannot hold you.

If I look to my own life, you are there. But I cannot hold you.

Who can write the poem that you are? Who dares attempt such a task? Even the simple act of breaking bread is never the same for you. There is no generic loaf: this flour, this yeast, this water— all are particular and various. Your hands tear this loaf at this place on its crust—each time different for you. And for us. Every day new? Is that who you are?

“But you, my child, reach for the loaf. Always. It represents me. Always. And those who were or will be. Always. Is that who I am to you?”

Each time I read you, there is a shift. Another layer added. Another meaning—hidden or exposed. Is that who you are?

Invite me. Engage me. Pull me into your poem. Help me write my own. Help me write you still and again into the question.

Prayer for Peace
Mystery God, you sent your miracle Son. We celebrate by breaking his body, reading his words, praying his prayer, writing his poem—so we might know him more deeply. Who are we? We are disciples of the Messiah. We are those who will share grace and peace with the world.

Spiritual Practice: Many Names of God
In many languages, God’s name contains the sound “Ahhh,” a sound we make when we are breathing out or sighing. Our prayer will use the Ahh names for God. Breathe out each name for God. You may either speak the name of God or find a single musical note to hold or chant as you sing God’s name. Pray or sing each name several times as you call on the God of many names: Yaweh, Adonai, Jehovah, Yeshua, Sophia, Allah, Alpha, Omega. Say or sing “amen” to close.

Peace Covenant
Today, Jehovah, I will reflect on what you are in my heart, knowing you are beyond mere words.

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4 Comments

  1. Yeshua and Sophia are totally different characters than the Only One God. Yeshua or Jeshua is the son of God, often by a lot of Christians better know as Jesus Christ and take as the god himself, though he is a Jewish man of flesh and blood who never claimed to be God and always said he could do nothing without his Father, our God, the only one to whom we should pray, like Jesus also prayed to Him (Jehovah).

  2. David R Brock

     /  5 July 2013

    I’m stealing part of this for my communion thoughts tomorrow. I’ll acknowledge the poet and minister! Thank you. DRB

  3. Dorcas Wilkinson

     /  5 July 2013

    Thank you Charles Curry and Lu for these 3 days of spiritual growth. I will take these beyond the now and use them in the future to discover the God, and the Christ, and who I am.

  1. Calling and Ascribing to Jehovah #8 Prayer #6 Communication and manifestation | Christadelphians : Belgian Ecclesia Brussel - Leuven

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